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Why do dog's eyes glow green on a photo?

Why do dog's eyes glow green on a photo?


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Taking my current profile picture as a prominent example:

This photo has been taken with flash. As I gather, this is the same effect that makes a human's eyes glow red on photos, namely the reflection of the flash at the choroid and then passing back through the retina.

The retina is full of bloodvessels and the blood inside them gives the reflected light it's reddish color.

If it's the same effect, why is the color different?


Dogs, cats, and many other mammals have a Tapetum lucidum which reflects light back through the retina to help with night vision. Humans don't have this layer. The tapetum is probably reflecting green light that would have normally been absorbed.


Green eye occurs when light enters the eye of an animal at the same level as the eye. If your pet looks up at your camera when the flash goes off, the light from the flash can reflect from the back of their retina and this can cause a colored glow over their pupils.

When light reflects off an object it does so in a sort of "V" shape (an angle equal and opposite to its entry). If your pet is looking directly at the camera and the flash is at the same level as their eye, the light enters their eye and is directed right back to the camera, causing the glow.

Quite often, this happens when the pupil of an eye is dilated such as in a dark room or when outside at night. The animal's pupil is naturally larger so they can see better at night and this also allows more reflected light to enter and exit the eye.


Why do dog's eyes glow green on a photo? - Biology

The other day I took pictures of these two Labradors using my flash. The pale dog’s eyes reflected brightly as one might expect but the other dog’s eyes merely glowed a dull red, and it reminded me of something I had once heard – that if his eyes didn’t reflect brightly, the dog may not have such good night vision. I looked into it a bit further.

The colour of the reflection comes from a layer of tissue at the back of the eye (the choroid) that contains blood vessels, brown pigment cells, and, in most dogs, a shiny cell layer (the tapetum). This tapetum may be yellow, green, blue, orange, or variations in between those colors and accounts for the brightness of a dog’s eye reflection.

Some dogs have very small tapeta or none at all so they show a very dull reflection or none at all (like this chocolate Labrador). Certain dogs, especially dogs with liver or orange-brown coat colour or with blue irises, have very little pigment in the back of the eye and the blood vessels that would normally be hidden by this pigment are visible and make the reflection glow bright red.

The tapetum is believed to be a nocturnal adaptation by increasing stimulation of the photosensitive cells of the retina – allowing a sort of double exposure.

The tapetum is absent in humans.

Science Daily says of dogs’ eyes compared to human eyes: ‘The canine’s biggest advantage is called the tapetum. This mirror-like structure in the back of the eye reflects light, giving the retina a second chance to register light that has entered the eye.

Here is what Melvin Pena has to say of dogs and night vision: ‘ A rough but poetic translation from Latin for “tapetum lucidum” is the “tapestry of light.” As the retinas draw in whatever light is available to dog eyes, and the rods process them as forms and movement, the tapetum lucidum reflects back whatever is left over for the dog to make use of again. Effectively, dogs can see in the dark because any available light is used twice, once coming in and again reflected back out’.

So here, put simply, is what could be happening in the Labrador’s case (scientifically there is a great deal more to the subject!):

Because this dog’s eyes appear a dull red they lack tapeta lucida and the result is the typical ‘red-eye’ seen in humans due to the appearance of the blood vessels of choroid and the underlying the cornea. Any available light is used just the once – coming in, and not reflected back out again as is the case with the majority of dogs.

For this reason, I conclude that what I had heard in the past about dogs not having such good night vision whose eyes don’t reflect a flash brightly, is true.


Why do dog's eyes glow green on a photo? - Biology

Dog’s eyes reflecting in the usual way to camera flash

The other day I took pictures of these two Labradors using my flash. The pale dog’s eyes reflected brightly as one might expect but the other dog’s eyes merely glowed a dull red, and it reminded me of something I had once heard – that if his eyes didn’t reflect brightly, the dog may not have such good night vision. I looked into it a bit further.

The colour of the reflection comes from a layer of tissue at the back of the eye (the choroid) that contains blood vessels, brown pigment cells, and, in most dogs, a shiny cell layer (the tapetum). This tapetum may be yellow, green, blue, orange, or variations in between those colors and accounts for the brightness of a dog’s eye reflection.

Eyes glowing red with camera flash

Some dogs have very small tapeta or none at all so they show a very dull reflection or none at all (like this chocolate Labrador). Certain dogs, especially dogs with liver or orange-brown coat colour or with blue irises, have very little pigment in the back of the eye and the blood vessels that would normally be hidden by this pigment are visible and make the reflection glow bright red.

The tapetum is believed to be a nocturnal adaptation by increasing stimulation of the photosensitive cells of the retina – allowing a sort of double exposure.

The tapetum is absent in humans.

Science Daily says of dogs’ eyes compared to human eyes: ‘The canine’s biggest advantage is called the tapetum. This mirror-like structure in the back of the eye reflects light, giving the retina a second chance to register light that has entered the eye.

Here is what Melvin Pena has to say of dogs and night vision: ‘ A rough but poetic translation from Latin for “tapetum lucidum” is the “tapestry of light.” As the retinas draw in whatever light is available to dog eyes, and the rods process them as forms and movement, the tapetum lucidum reflects back whatever is left over for the dog to make use of again. Effectively, dogs can see in the dark because any available light is used twice, once coming in and again reflected back out’.

So here, put simply, is what could be happening in the Labrador’s case (scientifically there is a great deal more to the subject!):

Because this dog’s eyes appear a dull red they lack tapeta lucida and the result is the typical ‘red-eye’ seen in humans due to the appearance of the blood vessels of choroid and the underlying the cornea. Any available light is used just the once – coming in, and not reflected back out again as is the case with the majority of dogs.

For this reason, I conclude that what I had heard in the past about dogs not having such good night vision whose eyes don’t reflect a flash brightly, is true.

Here is my story of these two lovely dogs and the other two dogs they live with.


3 Answers 3

The green shine is caused by tapetum lucidum. My Dachshund has it as well, although in both eyes, and the shine is actually very dim. As to your dog's differing appearance of her eyes,

Found on a forum called the Naked Scientists:

I'll have a go at it.

Here's what we know. The tapetum lucidum, formed by the choroid at the back of the eye, is wedged between layers of blood vessels on either side but itself is avascular. It is responsible for reflecting light of various colours, producing the characteristic iridescence seen in flash photography of animals and in front of car headlights, and is believed to be a nocturnal adaptation by increasing stimulation of the photosensitive cells of the retina.

In dogs and cats, the tapetum is made up of cells. These cells contain crystalline rods that are arranged in such a way that they split the light that hits them into its various colour components. A similar effect is seen in herbivores, but the structure of the tapetum varies in that it is fibrous (collagenous) rather than cellular, and it is the arrangement of the collagen fibres within the structure that is responsible for splitting light. The tapetum is absent in humans and pigs.

So here's what I think might be happening:

1) The eye that appears red lacks a tapetum lucidum and the result is the typical 'red-eye' seen in humans due to the appearance of the blood vessels of choroid and the underlying the cornea.

2) The dog has different crystalline or cellular arrangements in its eyes causing the reflected light to correspond to the different wavelengths. Interestingly, tapetum appears a blue-green colour in the Dutch sheep dog but an orangy colour in the Old English sheepdog.

3) The dog is slightly bung eyed and light is hitting the structure at a slightly different angle in one eye than in the other, affecting the way the light is reflected (but being an appauling physicist, I have no idea whether or not that is valid.)

So, my guess would be that your dog has tapetum lucidum in one eye and not the other, or he has it in both eyes, but one of them is a "lazy eye" or angled slightly differently, so the shine does not occur at the same angle when viewed by you. (More probably the first).

Edit: I now realize that I never really answered your question. No, there is no worry due to the single eye shine. Your dog will be able to see a minor bit better in very low light in the eye with the shine, but it should not affect his overall health.


Which Animals Have GREEN Eyes At Night?

We will continue by listing a couple of animals with green eyes in the dark. These are a little rarer as most animals will have yellow or red eyes in the dark.

Docs can have green eyes in the dark. This cute little golden retriever pup certainly looks adorable with the glowing eyes in the dark.

When you do see glowing eyes in the dark it will often be a cat or a dog. This is simply because these are some of the most common animals around areas where people live.

Here’s a cat with bright green eyes

Foxes

The eyes of the fox are also very intensive at night. They typically keep to themselves at night when they hunt. But if you do encounter them you should look for green (or yellow) eyes in the dark.

This fox has a mix of green and white eyes as he stares at you.

Opossums

Opossums will often leave a green reflection when they are lit up at night. Here are five Opossums in a tree.


A Quick Fix for “Pet Eye” in Dog Photographs

Foran amateur photographer,few phenomena are more annoying than pointing your camera at your dog, successfullycapturinghim or herin some fabulous pose or other (and/orwearing some adorable costume), andthen discovering that the beloved animal&rsquoseyes look like something out of a B horror flick: &ldquoVillage of the Damned Dogs,&rdquo perhaps?

This not-so-special effect &ndash known in the photo biz as &ldquopet eye&rdquo &ndashmay beperfectlyappropriate for Halloween for other occasions, not so much.

Why does &ldquopet eye&rdquo happen in photographs? For the answer, I consulted Dr. Alexandra van der Woerdt, DVM, MS, ACVO, ECVO, staff ophthalmologist at the Animal Medical Center in New York.

&ldquoThe reason that pet eyes show up different than human eyes in pictures is because most dogs (and cats) have a reflective structure in the back of the eye called a tapetum,&rdquo Dr. van der Woerdt explains. &ldquoThis will reflect the light [of a camera&rsquos flash]. It&rsquos also what you see when you see the shiny, bright eyes of deer in the headlights of a car. People don&rsquot have a tapetum, and that is why you can have red pupilsin a picture.&rdquo

As dogsage, a film develops on the eyes (to help prevent this, supplement with milk thistle). &ldquoThat haze that you notice in the eyes of older dogs is often referred to as a cataract, but it is not a cataract (which is a true opacity of the lens). Rather, it is a hardening of the lens &ndash nuclear sclerosis &ndash that happens with age in animals and people. People have small pupils, so you don&rsquot normally see the lens when you look at a person&rsquos eye and in young dogs, the lens is clear. But in older dogs, the lens is much denser and will givea hazy appearance to the eye.&rdquo

So it makes sense that older pets&rsquo peepers will show up even more demonically in pictures, because there&rsquos that much more lightness to reflect off the camera&rsquos flash. Of course, all this may be avoided by shooting in natural light, but that&rsquos not always possible.

The photographers whose work has graced this column &ndash thus far, they include Anneli Adolfsson, Lev Gorn, and Catherine Nance &ndash are professionals at the top of their game, so naturally their dog images are untouchable, whether or not they&rsquove been retouched.

But for the rest of us, subtle matters of lighting and Photoshop complicate the taking of dog snapshots. This is especially discouraging when it comes to photographing adoptable dogs at animal shelters. When posting dogs on Petfinder and other adoption sites, where a photo can sometimes mean the difference between life and death, the goal is to let the dogs look their very best &ndash and a pair of demonically glowing eyescan, sadly,beoff-putting, especially on a black dog.

Even &ldquored eye&rdquo photo editing software doesn&rsquot help, because &ldquopet eye&rdquo doesn&rsquot just come in red: it also shows up yellow, white, or &ndash for a truly extraterrestrial effect &ndash green. Happily,Kodak is coming to the rescue.

At selected Kodak Picture Kiosks, the photo giant offers a &ldquoPet Eye Retouch&rdquo service. The before-and-after shots above reveal what a great service this is it&rsquos also really easy to use.

Simply use the locator on the company&rsquos web site to find the Picture Kiosk with the pet feature nearest you, and bring your photos there. Select your photo, click &ldquoEdits & Enlargements,&rdquo and in the &ldquoMore Edits&rdquo menu select &ldquoRemove Pet Eye.&rdquo Save your changes and print your photo in seconds. It&rsquos that simple.

Kodak is currently holding a &ldquoPossessed Pets Photo Contest.&rdquo The winner gets a year&rsquos worth of free prints, which would come in veryhandy when you&rsquore preparingyourChristmas cards for sendoff.

Promises Kodak, whoseFacebook fan page has 63,031&PrimeLikes&rdquo as of this writing: &ldquoCreate a fancy frame for your &lsquopossessed pet&rsquo and share with your friends &ndash you could have this month&rsquos winning photo! Just for creating your photo, you can receive up to $5 off 20 4×6&Prime instant prints at the Kodak Picture Kiosk.&rdquo

That pretty much ensures that every pet photo you take will be a &hellip&rdquoKodak Moment.&rdquo


Why Do Animals' Eyes Glow In The Dark?

Eyes that glow in the pitch-black night make for many a scary tale. But why do some animals' eyes glow at night?

"A lot of the animals we see, especially the ones that go out at night, have a special, reflective surface right behind their retinas," says Dr. Cynthia Powell, a veterinary ophthalmologist at Colorado State University. That light-reflecting surface, called the tapetum lucidum, helps animals see better in the dark.

When light enters the eye, it's supposed to hit a photoreceptor that transmits the information to the brain, Powell explains. But sometimes the light doesn't hit the photoreceptor, so the tapetum lucidum acts as a mirror to bounce it back for a second chance.

A large number of animals have the tapetum lucidum, including deer, dogs, cats, cattle, horses and ferrets. Humans don't, and neither do some other primates. Squirrels, kangaroos and pigs don't have the tapeta, either.

And not all eyes animals' glow the same color. Powell says this is due to different substances — like riboflavin or zinc — in an animal's tapetum. "Also," she says, "there are varying amounts of pigment within the retina, and that can affect the color." Age and other factors also can change the color, so even two dogs of the same species could have eyes that glow different colors.

Cats often have eyes that glow bright green, though Siamese cats' eyes often glow bright yellow. Cat tapeta also tend to reflect a little bit more than dogs, Powell says.

"One of my favorites are miniature schnauzers," she says, which have eyes that tend to glow turquoise. "It's really beautiful."


Why are Poodles Prone to Eye Conditions?

Well, the poodle’s knack for developing these eyes conditions comes from the breed’s heredity.

See, like other purebred dogs, poodles have issues that have been passed down along the bloodline. This means eye problems could be wired into their DNA.

In other words, these eye issues are just a part of being a poodle at this point. It also doesn’t help that their physical stature isn’t quite suited for keeping their eyes out of danger.

For instance, long curly fur around your poodles eyes often gather debris throughout the day, and that debris can lead to irritation, according Here Pup.

And it doesn’t stop there either. Poodles are also notorious for being more prone to blocked tear ducts than other breeds, which can also lead to some eye conditions as well.

Overall, it seems everything about a poodle is working in opposition to keeping their eyes healthy and out of danger.

And you might think it’s isn’t a big deal, but this issue is something you’ll need to be aware of as a poodle owner.

For instance, most of the poodle owners I know, have had to deal with some eye issue whether it was something as minor as tear staining or something significant like cataracts.

Regardless of the condition, this issue isn’t something you should take lightly.


How do I fix a dog's wrong colored eyes in flash photos?

I am looking for the quickest way to fix this problem: the crazy colored eyes that happen when the flash hits a dog's eyes.

It is really annoying to capture a pretty decent shot of a dog, only to have the ghoulish colored eyes ruin everything about the image. I know that dogs have a wide range of ghoulish colors when it comes to them getting pet eye. But no matter what wrong color they come out, is there a quick fix for this?

Photo editing programs have red eye repair for humans, but it basically never works on pets' eyes.

Why don't they have anything simple like that for pets? A one or two step solution: remove the ghoulish color, insert correct color!

It would be great to have a large spectrum of colors to use (thinking about cats here, since dogs usually have brown, amber or blue eyes and cats tend to have more color variations.)

I have taken domestic rabbit photos. Some had red eyes and I used the human red eye function on the bunny's image to see what would happen but it didn't work. Out of frustration I find natural light makes my life easier, so I try to stick with that — which I am sure is obvious to all who have done pet photography. But some of your best opportunities for a great animal shot can happen indoors.

What is the easiest and quickest way to fix the pet eye phenomena? I have Adobe Photoshop 7, PhotoShop Essentials version 9, and a bunch of other photo editing programs. I am pretty tired of hand rendering my boxer's eyes by hand. It takes work to get just the right brown and not make it look painted in.


Watch the video: ΠΗΡΑ ΣΚΎΛΟ! ΨΩΝΙΑ ΣΤΟ ΚΕΝΤΡΟ!! vlog#2 (October 2022).