Information

1: Fundamentals of Microbiology - Biology

1: Fundamentals of Microbiology - Biology


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Microbiology is the study of microscopic organisms, those being unicellular (single cell), multicellular (cell colony), or acellular (lacking cells). As an application of microbiology, medical microbiology is often introduced with medical principles of immunology as microbiology and immunology. Otherwise, microbiology, virology, and immunology as basic sciences have greatly exceeded the medical variants, applied sciences.

  • 1.1: Introduction to Microbiology
    Microorganisms are typically too small to be seen with the naked eye. Bacteria, fungi, viruses, protozoa, and algae are the major groups of microorganisms. The vast majority of microorganisms are not harmful but rather beneficial. Microbiota refers to all of the microorganisms that live in a particular environment. A microbiome is the entire collection of genes found in all of the microbes associated with a particular host.
  • 1.2: Cellular Organization - Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells
    here are two basic types of cells in nature: prokaryotic and eukaryotic. Prokaryotic cells are structurally simpler than eukaryotic cells. The smaller a cell, the greater its surface to volume ratio. The smaller the surface to volume ratio, the more structurally complex (compartmentalized) a cell needs to be in order to carry out life functions. There are fundamental differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
  • 1.3: Classification - The Three Domain System
    Phylogeny refers to the evolutionary relationships between organisms. Organisms can be classified into one of three domains based on differences in the sequences of nucleotides in the cell's ribosomal RNAs (rRNA), the cell's membrane lipid structure, and its sensitivity to antibiotics. The three domains are the Archaea, the Bacteria, and the Eukarya. Prokaryotic organisms belong either to the domain Archaea or the domain Bacteria; organisms with eukaryotic cells belong to the domain Eukarya.
  • 1.E: Fundamentals of Microbiology (Exercises)
    These are homework exercises to accompany Kaiser's "Microbiology" TextMap. Microbiology is the study of microorganisms, which are defined as any microscopic organism that comprises either a single cell (unicellular), cell clusters or no cell at all (acellular). This includes eukaryotes, such as fungi and protists, and prokaryotes. Viruses and prions, though not strictly classed as living organisms, are also studied.

Thumbnail: A cluster of Escherichia coli bacteria magnified 10,000 times. (Public Domain; Eric Erbe, digital colorization by Christopher Pooley, both of USDA, ARS, EMU).


Fundamentals of Microbiology PDF Book

Language: English

Author: TNAU

Price: Free

Course Outlines

Module 1: History and Scope of Microbiology
Lesson 1. Historical perspective of microbiology
Lesson 2. Food, industrial and environmental microbiology
Lesson 3. Virology and Medical Microbiology

Module 2: Microscopy
Lesson 4. Light and electron microscopy
Lesson 5. Preparation for light microscopy
Lesson 6. Microbiological staining methods

Module 3: Microbial Taxonomy
Lesson 7. Classification, Nomenclature, and Identification
Lesson 8. Major characteristics used in microbial taxonomy
Lesson 9. Methods of classification

Module 4: Structure and Functions of Prokaryotic Cells

Lesson 10. Size, shape and arrangement of prokaryotic cells
Lesson 11. Cell wall, cytoplasmic membrane, membrane transport systems
Lesson 12. Cytoplasm, cytoplasmic inclusions and vacuoles, cytoskeleton
Lesson 13. Structure and germination of endospore, microbial locomotion
Lesson 14. An overview of difference between prokaryotes and eukaryotes

Module 5: Microbial Growth and Nutrition

Lesson 15. Modes of cell division
Lesson 16. Quantitative measurement of growth
Lesson 17. Bacterial nutrition
Lesson 18. Environmental factors affecting growth of microorganisms
Lesson 19. Control of microbial growth by physical methods
Lesson 20. Control of microbial growth by chemical methods
Module 6: Bacterial Genetics

Lesson 21. DNA structure
Lesson 22. DNA replication, transcription, translation
Lesson 23. Genetic mutation
Lesson 24. Genetic recombination systems
Lesson 25. Recombinant DNA technology
Module 7: Environmental Microbiology

Lesson 26. Microbiota of soil
Lesson 27. Interaction among Soil microflora
Lesson 28 Microbiology of air
Lesson 29. Enumeration of microorganisms in air, Control of Airborne microorganism
Lesson 30. Distribution of Microorganisms in aquatic environment
Lesson 31. Microbiology of aquatic water

Lesson 32. Waste Water Treatment and disposal

Feedback: After Reading these ICAR eCourse, please give your feedback for improve of the e-Course contents on this website. Click Here

Disclaimer: The information on this website does not warrant or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of the courseware contents.
The contents are provided free for noncommercial purpose such as teaching, training, research, extension and self learning.

If you are facing any Problem than fill form Contact Us


Fundamentals of Microbiology

Jeffrey Pommerville is Emeritus Professor of Biology and Microbiology at Glendale Community College (GCC) in Glendale, Arizona, where he taught microbiology and introductory biology. He also had served as the Course Assessment Coordinator for the Biology Department at GCC. Before coming to GCC, he was on the biology faculty at Texas A & M University. Dr. Pommerville received his BS and PhD from the University of California-Santa Barbara. While at GCC, Dr. Pommerville served as principal investigator on several NSF grants, including Systemic Reform in Science (SyRIS) that developed a strategy to reform and integrate the introductory sciences. He is the author of more than 50 research and education research papers and was the Perspectives Editor for the Journal of Microbiology and Biology Education, a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). Dr. Pommerville has received numerous professional honors, including: the 2008 Carski Foundation Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award from ASM, the Golden Microscope Award from the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, the Ohaus Award for Innovations in Science Teaching from the National Science Teachers Association, and was one of the first recipients of a Faculty Distinguished Teaching Award from his home institution. He is a member of ASM and AAAS. Dr. Pommerville is a past co-chair for the ASM's Conference for Undergraduate Educators as well as a past chair of Division W of ASM. Besides Microbes and Society, Fifth Edition, Dr. Pommerville is author of Fundamentals of Microbiology, 11 Edition (2018), Fundamentals of Microbiology: Body Systems Edition, Third Edition (2016), as well as Encounters in Microbiology, Vol. 1 and 2 (2009), and Guide to Infectious Diseases by Body System, Second Edition (2012). All are published by Jones & Bartlett Learning.


SCHOOL OF MEDICINE MICROBIOLOGY (MEDICINE) MICROBIOLOGY

MICROM 101 Microbes and Society (5) NW
Intended for liberal arts majors and students not majoring in the biological sciences. Focuses on activities of bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms, and their influence on humans. Microbe-related topics include disease, bioterrorism, food, biotechnology, and ecology. Examines the nature of scientific inquiry, along with major biological concepts.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 101

MICROM 301 General Microbiology (3) NW D. Anderson, R. Bumgarner
Acquaints students with microorganisms and their activities. Topics include microbial cell structure and function, metabolism, microbial genetics, and the role of microorganisms in disease, immunity, and other selected applied areas. Prerequisite: either CHEM 120, CHEM 140, CHEM 142, or CHEM 145. Offered: ASpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 301

MICROM 302 General Microbiology Laboratory (2) NW
Laboratory course primarily for students taking MICROM 301. Covers a variety of microbiological techniques, with experiments designed to illustrate major concepts of bacteriology, virology, and immunology. No auditors. Offered: ASpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 302

MICROM 402 Fundamentals of General Microbiology Laboratory (3) NW
Isolation of a broad range of nonpathogenic bacteria from natural sources, using selective and enrichment techniques, with microscopic, biochemical, and molecular identification. Related exercises include genetics, physiology, quantitation, and growth energetics. Prerequisite: BIOL 200. Offered: ASp.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 402

MICROM 410 Fundamentals of General Microbiology I (3) NW
Survey of the microbial world, metabolism, biosynthesis, regulation, growth, structure, and function. Required for students majoring in microbiology recommended for students majoring in biology. Prerequisite: minimum grade of 2.3 in BIOL 200 either CHEM 223, CHEM 237, or CHEM 335. Instructors: Parsek, Traxler Offered: A.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 410

MICROM 411 Bacterial Genetics (4) NW
Molecular genetics: description of fundamental genetic processes such as mutation, repair, genetic exchange, recombination, and gene expression. Use of genetic strategies to analyze complex biological processes. Focuses on prokaryotic organisms. Prerequisite: BIOL 200 either CHEM 223, CHEM 237, or CHEM 335. Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 411

MICROM 412 Prokaryotic Diversity (3) NW
Structure, biochemical properties, and genetics of the major groups of prokaryotes. Prerequisite: BIOL 200. Instructors: Greenberg, Leigh Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 412

MICROM 413 Special Topics in Microbiology (1, max. 3)
Examines current subjects in microbiology. Credit/no-credit only.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 413

MICROM 431 Prokaryotic Recombinant DNA Techniques (3) NW
Laboratory course emphasizing concepts and techniques/methodologies in recombinant DNA research employing bacteria and their viruses. Topics and experiments/demonstrations include genomic and plasmid DNA isolation, restriction mapping, cloning, transposon mutagenesis, sequencing, and Western and Southern blotting. No auditors. Prerequisite: either BIOL 200 or MICROM 301. Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 431

MICROM 435 Microbial Ecology (3) NW
Consideration of the various roles that microorganisms, particularly bacteria and cyanobacteria, play in environmental processes. The interrelationships among microorganisms and the effects of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of their environment are discussed and assessed. Prerequisite: BIOL 180. Instructors: Stahl
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 435

MICROM 442 Medical Bacteriology (3) NW
Medically important bacterial pathogens are discussed in terms of the clinical, therapeutic, and epidemiological aspects of diseases caused by them, molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and their identification in the clinical laboratory. Laboratory course, MICROM 443 coordinates. Prerequisite: BIOL 200. Instructors: Cookson Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 442

MICROM 443 Medical Bacteriology Laboratory (3) NW
Required for medical technology students, microbiology majors elective for medical students. Procedures for isolation and identification of pathogenic bacteria, testing their susceptibility to antibiotics. No auditors. Prerequisite: BIOL 200. Offered: AW.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 443

MICROM 445 Medical Virology (3) NW
Introduces medical virology emphasizing basic understanding of the pathogenesis and replication of medically important viruses including the spread, diagnosis, epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of human viral diseases. Prerequisite: either BIOL 180 or BIOL 200 Sp. Instructors: Lagunoff, Smith
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 445

MICROM 450 Molecular Biology of Viruses (3) NW
Introduction to the molecular biology of viruses and virus-host relationships. Designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students in the biological sciences. Coverage includes bacterial and animal viruses, with an emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of viral gene expression and regulation. Prerequisite: BIOL 200. Instructors: Champoux Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 450

MICROM 460 Medical Mycology and Parasitology (3) D. ANDERSON, M. CHANDLER, C. FISHER, S. MURPHY
Examines medically important fungi and parasites in terms of the symptoms, diagnosis, epidemiology, and therapy of the diseases they cause as well as their mechanisms of pathogenesis. The laboratory course MICROM 461 complements this lecture course but is not required. Prerequisite: BIOL 200 or MICROM 301 Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 460

MICROM 461 Medical Mycology and Parasitology Laboratory (2) D. ANDERSON, M. CHANDLER
Hands-on practice to identify medically important fungi and parasites, using live, preserved, and stained samples. Demonstrations along with limited procedures are used to illustrate important features used to distinguish organisms. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MICROM 460, which may be taken concurrently. Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 461

MICROM 482 Peer Teaching Assistants in Microbiology (1-5, max. 10)
Direct experience in teaching a microbiology laboratory class. Peer TA's attend concurrent accompanying lecture course, meet weekly to coordinate, give introductory lab remarks, supervise the execution of lab exercises, and assist in preparing/grading of quizzes/exams. Training in teaching techniques, approaches. Student evaluation provided. Prerequisite: MICROM 402 MICROM 410. Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 482

MICROM 495 Honors Undergraduate Research (*-) Leigh
Specific problems in microbiology or immunology. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 495

MICROM 496 Undergraduate Library Research (2)
An introduction to library research techniques and to microbiological literature. Staff assign a topic and supervise the project. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 496

MICROM 499 Undergraduate Laboratory Research (*-, max. 35) Leigh
Specific problems in microbiology or immunology. Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 499

MICROM 500 Introduction to Research (*, max. 20)
Introduction to research areas of the faculty and the techniques employed in their investigations. Prerequisite: graduate standing in microbiology or permission of instructor. Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 500

MICROM 520 Seminar (1, max. 30) Fang
Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSp.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 520

MICROM 522 Current Research in Microbiology (1, max. 30)
Weekly student and faculty seminar presentations based on the current literature. Prerequisite: graduate standing in microbiology. Instructors: Harwood, Merrikh, Parsek Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSp.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 522

MICROM 526 Research of Cell Surface Problems (1, max. 30)
Weekly research seminar and discussion of scientific literature pertaining to the process of membrane protein biogenesis. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Instructors: Traxler Credit/no-credit only.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 526

MICROM 529 Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenesis (1, max. 30)
Student and faculty seminar presentations based on current research pertaining to mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis at the molecular and cellular levels. Prerequisite: graduate standing in microbiology. Instructors: Fang Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSp.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 529

MICROM 532 Methanogenesis Research Meeting (1, max. 30)
Weekly seminar concerning research topics in the genetics and biochemistry of selected bacteria. Prerequisite: MICROM 410, permission of instructor. Instructors: Leigh Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 532

MICROM 533 Herpesvirus Research Meeting (1, max. 30)
Weekly research seminar and discussion of scientific literature pertaining to the study of molecular virology of Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Instructors: Lagunoff Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 533

MICROM 534 Research Seminar in Salmonella Pathogenesis (1, max. 30) Fang
Provides a formal group setting for discussion and evaluation of a student's research progress. Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 534

MICROM 540 Virology (3) J. Hyde, M. Lagunoff, J. Smith
The molecular biology, transmission, and pathogenesis of human viruses will be explored. In addition to general principles of virology, lectures and paper discussions will focus on specific human pathogens including HIV, herpesviruses, ebolaviruses, alphaviruses, and adenoviruses, among others. Recommended: one year of undergraduate cellular and molecular biology Offered: A, even years.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 540

MICROM 553 Molecular Interactions of Bacteria with their Hosts (3)
The processes bacteria employ to shape interactions with their hosts will be explored in molecular detail through selected examples in the literature. Prerequisite: One year of undergraduate cellular and molecular biology. recommended: An introductory course in microbiology is recommended. Offered: A, odd years.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 553

MICROM 554 Seminar in Molecular and Medical Microbiology (1, max. 15)
Weekly one-hour seminar in which recent advances in molecular biology of microbial pathogenesis or the current research of the participants is presented and discussed critically. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Instructors: Cookson Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSp.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 554

MICROM 555 Advanced Clinical Microbiology (2.5)
Attendance at daily plate rounds of the Division of Clinical Microbiology. Designed to increase understanding of clinical microbiological work and its application to the care of the patient. Prerequisite: MICROM 443 and permission of instructor. Instructors: Butler-Wu, Fang Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSp.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 555

MICROM 560 Research and Journal Club in Retrovirology (1, max. 30)
Weekly research seminar and discussion of literature in areas of retroviral replication and transformation. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Instructors: Linial Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 560

MICROM 562 Oncogene and Retrovirus Research Seminar (1, max. 30)
Weekly discussions of ongoing research related to retroviral replication, retroviral oncogeneses and pathology. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Instructors: Linial, Overbaugh Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 562

MICROM 585 Research in Cell and Molecular Biology (1, max. 30)
Weekly research seminar. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Instructors: Champoux Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 585

MICROM 588 Research in Applied Microbiology (1, max. 30)
Weekly research seminar and discussion of scientific literature pertaining to applied microbiology. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Instructors: Lidstrom Credit/no-credit only. Offered: jointly with CHEM E 588 AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 588

MICROM 599 Research Presentations (2)
Current research review. Credit/no-credit only.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 599

MICROM 600 Independent Study or Research (*-)
Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 600

MICROM 650 Microbiology Clerkship in Scientific Teaching ([1-6]-, max. 15)
The pedagogical requirement addressed by this course is direct experience in teaching undergraduate microbiology classes under the direct oversight and mentorship of regular course instructors. By the end of this course, the graduate student will have developed skills, abilities and insights as a science educator and communicator through the sustained support and guidance of the instructor of record. Prerequisite: PhD student standing. Offered: AWSp.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 650

MICROM 800 Doctoral Dissertation (*-)
Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: MICROM 800


1: Fundamentals of Microbiology - Biology

Avoid resits and achieve higher grades with the best study guides, textbook notes, and class notes written by your fellow students

Avoid examination resits

Your fellow students know the appropriate material to use to deliver high quality content. With this great service and assistance from fellow students, you can become well prepared and avoid having to resits exams.

Get the best grades

Your fellow student knows the best materials to research on and use. This guarantee you the best grades in your examination. Your fellow students use high quality materials, textbooks and notes to ensure high quality

Earn from your notes

Get paid by selling your notes and study materials to other students. Earn alot of cash and help other students in study by providing them with appropriate and high quality study materials.


Total Program Hours 120

Course List
Code Title Semester Credit Hours
Select one course from the following:
BIOL 300-499
OCNG 320Biological Oceanography3
Select remaining courses from the following:
Industrial Microbiology
BIOL 352Diagnostic Bacteriology4
BIOL 414Developmental Biology3
BIOL 430Biological Imaging4
BIOL 450/BICH 450Genomics4
BIOL 461Antimicrobial Agents1
BESC 401Bioenvironmental Microbiology3
BESC 402Microbial Processes in Bioremediation3
Environmental Microbiology
BIOL 352Diagnostic Bacteriology4
BIOL 430Biological Imaging4
BIOL 440Marine Biology4
SCSC 405Soil and Water Microbiology3
BESC 401Bioenvironmental Microbiology3
BESC 402Microbial Processes in Bioremediation3
BESC 403Sampling and Environmental Monitoring3
Medical Microbiology
BIOL 352Diagnostic Bacteriology4
BIOL 445Biology of Viruses3
BIOL 454Immunology3
BIOL 455Laboratory in Immunology2
BIOL 456Medical Microbiology3
VTPB 487/BIOL 487Biomedical Parasitology4
Molecular Microbiology
BIOL 352Diagnostic Bacteriology4
BIOL 413Cell Biology3
BIOL 430Biological Imaging4
BIOL 445Biology of Viruses3

© 2021-2022 Texas A&M University
College Station, Texas 77843


Chapter 1

As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.

Want to cite, share, or modify this book? This book is Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 and you must attribute OpenStax.

    If you are redistributing all or part of this book in a print format, then you must include on every physical page the following attribution:

  • Use the information below to generate a citation. We recommend using a citation tool such as this one.
    • Authors: Nina Parker, Mark Schneegurt, Anh-Hue Thi Tu, Philip Lister, Brian M. Forster
    • Publisher/website: OpenStax
    • Book title: Microbiology
    • Publication date: Nov 1, 2016
    • Location: Houston, Texas
    • Book URL: https://openstax.org/books/microbiology/pages/1-introduction
    • Section URL: https://openstax.org/books/microbiology/pages/chapter-1

    © Aug 20, 2020 OpenStax. Textbook content produced by OpenStax is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 license. The OpenStax name, OpenStax logo, OpenStax book covers, OpenStax CNX name, and OpenStax CNX logo are not subject to the Creative Commons license and may not be reproduced without the prior and express written consent of Rice University.


    In This Department

    Welcome to our annual Awards Ceremony. While we’re sad not to be able to celebrate in person, we hope you enjoy our YouTube premiere presented by our faculty and staff. Please join us for the premiere, available on May 12th at 10am.
    Let’s honor the dedicated students receiving departmental awards and scholarships, and celebrate the end of the academic year. The complete list of our academic award winners can be found on the 2021 Biology Awardee Information Page.


    Microbiology

    Graduate students pursuing a PhD in Microbiology take a minimum of nine courses. Students consult the Graduate Advisor of the Committee on Microbiology to develop a plan of study that fulfills the program course requirements and meets the student’s particular interests in microbiology. The philosophy of graduate coursework is to develop a foundation of knowledge for the first-year graduate student. Of course, the basis of graduate training in microbiology is the performance of original laboratory research, which begins in winter or spring of the first year.

    Microbiology coursework is complemented by a set of courses in other disciplines in the Biological Sciences Division including practical courses in Quantitative and Computational Approaches to Biological Research. Interdisciplinary study is a hallmark of our program and is encouraged.

    Additional information regarding the curriculum for graduate students in the Committee on Microbiology can be found in the Committee on Microbiology Student Handbook.

    I. Lecture Classes for Graduate Students of the Committee on Microbiology
    Fall Quarter Classes

    BCMB 30400
    BCMB 30600
    BCMB/MGCB 31400
    BCMB/MGCB 31600
    ECEV 32500
    GEOS 36650
    IMMU 31200
    MICR 30600

    Protein Fundamentals
    Nucleic Acid Structure and Function
    Genetic Analysis of Model Organisms
    Cell Biology I
    Evolutionary Aspects of Gene Regulation
    Environmental Microbiology
    Host Pathogen Interactions
    Fundamentals of Bacterial Physiology

    Winter Quarter Classes

    BCMB 31100
    BCMB/MGCB 31200
    BCMB 31700
    ECEV 33365
    ECEV 35600
    GEOS 33800
    IMMU 31500
    MICR 31600

    Evolution of Biological Molecules
    Molecular Biology I
    Cell Biology II
    Evolutionary and Genomic Medicine: Dynamics at the Host-Microbe Interface
    Population Genetics
    Global Biogeochemical Cycles
    Advanced Immunology I
    Molecular Basis of Bacterial Disease

    Spring Quarter Classes

    BCMB 30800
    BCMB/MGCB 31300
    BCMB 32200
    BSDG 55000
    GEOS 36600
    IMMU 30266
    IMMU 32000
    MICR 34600
    MICR 33000

    Single Molecule Biochemistry
    Molecular Biology II
    Biophysics of Biomolecules
    Scientific Inquiry/Ethical Conduct
    Geobiology
    Molecular Immunology
    Advanced Immunology II
    Introduction to Virology
    Bacteria/Bacteriophage Genetics and Cell Biology

    II. Training in Quantitative and Computation Approaches to Biological Research
    Quantitative Approaches at Marine Biological Laboratory

    Incoming students from all graduate programs in the UChicago Biological Sciences Division (BSD) attend the Quantitative Approaches Bootcamp at the Marine Biological Lab (MBL), an affiliate of the University of Chicago. The goal of the Quantitative Approaches Bootcamp is for our students to develop computational, statistical, and professional skills, become familiar with the MBL, and get to know your fellow first-year students in the BSD through an intensive retreat atmosphere.

    Software Carpentry Workshop

    Software Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing. This hands-on workshop is aimed at intermediate programmers that know the basics of R and want to learn more. It is ideal for past attendees of our novice Software Carpentry workshops (e.g. 2013, 2014), incoming graduate students that attended the MBL Quantitative Approaches Bootcamp, and graduate students or postdocs that currently use R for their research.

    III. Seminars of the Committee on Microbiology

    During the Autumn, Winter and Spring Quarters, the Committee on Microbiology will host a seminar series comprised of seven to ten presentations by faculty invited from other institutions. A reading and discussion session will accompany the seminar series, MICR 39000 Introduction to Experimental Microbiology. In the session, which meets for one hour on a day preceding each week's seminar, first year graduate students will discuss with their peers and a Microbiology faculty member three original research papers of the invited speaker. Following the seminar and the conventional question and answer period, first year graduate students of the Committee on Microbiology are invited to question the speaker on her or his research and to discuss their own research for a period of 1 hour. In this manner, we will provide students with an intellectual environment that reveals the discovery process and research frontiers in various laboratories and fields. First year graduate students are required to register for the course, MICR 39000 Introduction to Experimental Microbiology, and will receive one credit for attending the seminar series (and the reading/discussion section) in the Autumn, Winter and Spring Quarters of the first year of graduate school.

    IV. Research Forums of the Committee on Microbiology

    All graduate students and honors undergraduate students of the Committee on Microbiology will present at a research forum once each year. The research forum meets on Fridays at noon in CLSC 119 during the autumn, winter and spring quarters. Students and postdoctoral fellows present their recent research data for critical evaluation by the faculty of the Committee on Microbiology. This course provides a venue to ensure continued progress of graduate students in their thesis projects. First year graduate students are required to register for the course, MICR 40000 Microbiology Research Forum, and will receive one credit for attending throughout the Autumn, Winter and Spring Quarters of the first year of graduate school.


    Biology

    Biology is the study of life. Biology courses taught in the department include an introductory course, a series of three courses for students majoring in Biology, and more specialized courses that focus on topics such as ecology, marine biology, and human biology.
    Biology majors should note that the course sequence for the majors has recently been updated: Information for Biology Majors

    Following is a list of all courses taught in the Biology discipline. Many of these courses are taught every semester, but be sure to check the current schedule for specific courses and locations. Each course number is linked to its specific description. Please also note our collection of field courses.

    BIO 2.1 Fundamentals of Biology (Cell and Molecular)
    BIO 2.2 Fundamentals of Biology (Evolution, Genetics, and Zoology)
    BIO 2.3 Fundamentals of Biology (Botany and Ecology)
    BIO 10 Introduction to Principles of Biology
    BIO 12 Basic Concepts of Ecology
    BIO 16 Introduction to Biology Through Current Issues
    BIO 25 Marine Biology
    BIO 27 Biology Marine Mammals
    BIO 31 Tropical Biodiversity and Conservation
    BIO 49 Independent Study in Biology
    BIO 85.1 Pepperwood Natural History: Physical Environment
    BIO 85.2 Pepperwood Natural History- Biotic Environment
    BIO 100 Basic Biology Skills


    UGA Anatomy and Physiology 2 Lab Manual, 3rd Edition

    Ann Massey, Lindsey Beebe, and DeLoris Hesse

    This lab manual was created for Anatomy and Physiology II at the University of Georgia under a Textbook Transformation Grant and revised through a Scaling Up OER Pilot Grant.

    • Blood Composition
    • Blood Typing
    • Heart Anatomy
    • Cardiovascular Physiology
    • Systemic Blood Vessels
    • Anatomy of the Respiratory System
    • Physiology of the Respiratory System
    • Renal Anatomy
    • Urinalysis
    • Digestive System Anatomy
    • Digestive Physiology
    • Male Reproductive System
    • Female Reproductive System

    Accessible files with optical character recognition (OCR) and auto-tagging provided by the Center for Inclusive Design and Innovation.


    Watch the video: Introduction To Microbiology (September 2022).


Comments:

  1. Travis

    you were not mistaken, exactly

  2. Calidan

    The authoritative message :)

  3. Seeton

    Relevance is the courtesy of the topic. It's good that we posted this article. Write more.



Write a message