Category Optional

Human Development Biology - Embryology
Optional

Human Development Biology - Embryology

Developmental biology: focus on the study of embryonic development What is Human Developmental Biology? Human Developmental Biology, also known as Embryology, is a branch of biology responsible for studying morphogenesis (development from the zygote), embryonic development and nervous system of gametogenesis (the process in which gametes are produced in sexually reproducing organisms) until the moment of the birth of living beings.

Read More

Optional

Human blood

Red Blood Cells What It Is - Definition Blood is a liquid connective tissue produced in the red bone marrow that flows through the blood veins, arteries and capillaries of vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Blood is one of the three components of the circulatory system, the other two being the heart and blood vessels.
Read More
Optional

Calangos

Tropidurus itambere: example of a species of calango What they are - biological definition Calangos (popular and generic name given in Brazil) are small lizards, which are part of the family Lacertidae (family of scaly reptiles). Main features - They are small lizards. Most species measure between 20cm and 30cm.
Read More
Optional

Histology - Study of Body Tissues

Histology: Study of Human Body Tissues What It Is (summary) Histology is the science that studies the tissues of the human body. Tissues are formed by groups of cells of similar shape and function. Simply put we can understand that the cell is the fundamental unit of the body, the tissues are the association of several similar cells, the organs are the junction of various tissues that perform a certain function, the systems are the union of various organs (nervous system , lymphatic, skeletal, respiratory, integumentary, circulatory, etc.
Read More
Optional

Lymphatic system

Lymphatic system: drainage of excess interstitial fluid What is and functions of the lymphatic system The lymphatic system has the function of draining excess interstitial fluid (fluid where cells are submerged and from which they draw their nutrients and eliminate waste substances from their lymphatic system). metabolism) in order to return it to the blood and thus maintain the fluid balance in the body.
Read More
Optional

Human epidermis

Epidermis: superficial layer of human skin What is (meaning) The epidermis is the superficial part of human skin. It is formed by epithelial tissue being thinner than the other part of the skin (dermis). The meaning of the word epidermis comes from the Greek, where "epi" means above and "dermis" means skin.
Read More
Optional

Muscle tissues

Cardiac striated muscle tissue Main features The human body has four main types of tissue (epithelial, connective, muscular and nervous). Muscle tissues have mainly the functions of movement, contraction of organs and support of the human body (auxiliary function in conjunction with bones).
Read More
Optional

Invertebrate animals

Invertebrates: No Backbone Introduction There are two main groups in the animal kingdom: vertebrates and invertebrates. Both belong to the kingdom Animalia, however, the body structure varies greatly from one group to the other. Main characteristics of invertebrates The invertebrate group includes 97% of all animal species except vertebrates (fish, reptiles, amphibians, birds and mammals).
Read More
Optional

Curiosities about the Human Body

Femur: Largest Bone in the Human Body Curiosities about the Human Body - An adult human body is made up of approximately 48 trillion cells. - An adult's salivary glands can produce about 1.5 liters of saliva per day. - The body of an adult has 206 bones. However, a newborn has 300 bones.
Read More
Optional

Sebaceous Glands

Sebaceous Glands: Several Important Functions in the Human Body Introduction (what they are / main features) The sebaceous glands are located in the dermis, and as they flow (in most cases) into the skin, are considered exocrine. The cells inside the gland secrete a lipid into the light, and then to the hair follicle.
Read More
Optional

Mammalian gestation time

Mammals: gestation time varies from species to species Introduction Mammalian gestation time varies from species to species. It lasts long enough for the fetus to develop until it is ready for birth. Below is, as an example, the average gestation time (gestational period) of various mammalian species.
Read More
Optional

Curiosities about the Human Heart

Heart: One of the main organs of the human body Curiosities about the human heart - The heart acts as a kind of pump, driving blood throughout the body. - The heart is a muscular and fibrous organ, ie composed mainly of muscles and fibers. At rest, a person has blood pumped through the heart, throughout the body, in approximately 50 seconds.
Read More
Optional

Esophagus

Human Esophagus: Important Muscle Conductor What It Is The esophagus is a muscle conducting organ, located between the lower extremity of the laryngopharynx and the upper stomach, which is part of the digestive tract joining the pharynx to the stomach. Function Its main function is to bring food to the stomach.
Read More
Optional

Bile or Bile

Liver: Bile Producer Introduction Bile, or bile, is a fluid produced by the liver that is stored in the gallbladder. It acts in the digestion of fat and the absorption of nutritive substances from the diet as they pass through the intestines. Knowing the bile (characteristics) The bile is excreted by the liver, follows the bile ducts, passes to the gallbladder, going to the intestine, where it emulsifies the fats; Its color is usually yellow, with a greenish tint.
Read More
Optional

Pineal gland

Pineal Gland Localization What It Is The Pineal Gland, also known as the neural epiphysis, is a small-sized endocrine gland located at the top of the third ventricle of the brain, ie the central part of the human brain. Function Secreting melatonin, the hormone responsible for regulating body rhythms (circadian cycles), biological clock and sleep.
Read More
Optional

Small intestine

Intestine: Important Nutrient Absorption Function Introduction (What It Is) The small intestine is a part of the digestive tract that starts in the stomach and goes into the large intestine. Main Function Its main function is to absorb the nutrients needed by the human body. Physical characteristics: Measures approximately 3 meters in length.
Read More
Optional

Ovary

Ovary: Production of Reproductive Cells (Eggs) What It Is The ovary is an organ, belonging to the female reproductive system, present only in females, including humans. It is in this organ that reproductive cells or eggs are produced. Usually the woman has two ovaries, one on either side of the uterus, and these are connected by the fallopian tubes.
Read More
Optional

Respiratory System Functions

Respiratory System: Functions of Extreme Importance to the Human Body Introduction Respiratory System Components The Respiratory System consists of: two lungs and airways (pharynx, larynx, trachea, and pulmonary bronchi). Respiratory System Functions: - Transfer oxygen, which is inhaled from the air, to the blood; - Transfer carbon dioxide, which is present in large amounts in venous blood, to the exhaled air; - Helps to regulate the acidity present in the fluids of the human body; - It acts in the regulation of the pH of the blood; - Filter, heat and humidify the air we breathe; - It acts in the production of the sounds we emit, because the air flow leaves the lungs and goes to the vocal folds.
Read More
Optional

Major bones of the human body

Skeletal System: 206 Bones Main Bones of the Human Body The Skeletal System of an adult human being consists of 206 bones. HEAD BONES - Skull bones: frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital, sphenoid and ethmoid. - Bones of the Face: Zygomatic or malar, maxillary, nasal, mandible, palatine, lacrimal, vomer and inferior nasal concha.
Read More
Optional

Human integument

Skin: the main component of the human integument What is The integument is the outer part of the human body. Components of the human integument: - Skin - Hair and hair - Sebaceous glands - Wax glands - Sweat glands - Nails Functions of the human integument - It acts to protect the human body against external factors (ultraviolet rays, microorganisms, impacts, etc.).
Read More
Optional

Gallbladder

Gallbladder: Bile Storage Introduction (what it is) The gallbladder is a muscle organ responsible for bile storage and is present in most vertebrates. In humans, it is a pear-shaped membranous sac that lies below the surface of the right lobe of the liver, just behind the lower ribs.
Read More