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Herpetology
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Herpetology

Herpetology: science that studies amphibians and reptiles What is Herpetology is a science that studies reptiles and amphibians. She is an important branch of zoology. The word herpetology derives from the junction of two Greek words: herpeton (crawling) and logos (knowledge, study). Importance Due to the large amount of amphibians and reptiles that exist in various ecosystems around the world, this science is extremely important for the advancement of knowledge of these animals and their interactions with others and the environment.

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Vegetable Kingdom

Vegetable Kingdom: Also known as Plantae Introduction (what it is) The Vegetable Kingdom, scientifically known as Plantae, is made up of approximately 300,000 known species, among which are many types of herbs, trees, shrubs, microscopic plants. , etc. Composition The organisms that make up this kingdom are mostly autotrophic, that is, beings whose cellular organization relies on chloroplasts (organelles specializing in the production of organic matter from inorganic matter, including solar energy).
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Vegetation Types

Aquatic plants: hydrophytes Introduction We can classify the vegetation of a forest or forest according to two main criteria: the present humidity and the types of leaves. Vegetation types according to the presence of moisture: - Hydrophytes: vegetation present mainly in rivers and lakes.
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Pollination

Pollination: Important in Plant Reproduction What is Pollination is the transport of pollen grains from one flower to another, or to their own stigma. It is through this process that flowers reproduce. Pollen Transport Pollen transfer can occur in two ways: through the help of living things (bees, butterflies, beetles, bats, birds, etc.).
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Plant Groups

Plants: Presence of Two Major Groups Introduction Although they all belong to the Plantae Kingdom, plants can be divided into groups and subgroups according to certain (specific) characteristics that differentiate each other. According to the visibility of the gamete producing structures, the plants can be divided into: cryptogams and phanerogams.
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Urinary system

Urinary System: Various Functions Composition (Organs) The urinary system consists of two kidneys, two ureters, one urinary bladder and one urethra. In addition to eliminating unnecessary and harmful substances (such as cell metabolic waste, toxins, etc.), this system also performs other very important functions for our body.
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Types of Plant Roots

Tabular roots of a fig tree Introduction Each plant has a specific type of adaptation to the conditions of the ecological system in which it lives. The roots, for example, have special adaptations so that the plant can develop properly. Root types (root adaptations): Tabular roots They have two important functions in the plant: they help in fixing to the soil, besides acting as respiratory roots.
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Gymnosperms

Conifers: example of gymnosperms What they are Gymnosperms are vascular and spermatophyte plants that produce seeds. What they are Gymnosperms are vascular and spermatophyte plants that produce seeds. Main characteristics of gymnosperm plants: - The seeds are not formed in a closed ovary.
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Protist Kingdom

Paramecium aurelia: Protist Kingdom ciliated protozoan Introduction (what it is) The Protist Kingdom encompasses a wide variety of single-cell (single-cell) organisms and some simple forms of multi-cell (multi-nucleus) and multicellular (multi-cell) organisms. Main Characteristics of the Protist Kingdom Some eukaryotic organisms also form part of the protist kingdom. These beings have a nucleus surrounded by a cell membrane, DNA associated with histones (the main proteins that make up chromatin and which play an important role in the regulation of genes) and organelles such as: for example mitochondria and chloroplasts.
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Orchids

Orchid: Exotic and Beautiful Flower Introduction (what they are) Orchids are plants and flowers of the orchid family of the order of microsperms. They are typical of tropical regions, although they can be found on all continents except Antarctica. Brazil, for example, is a country where we find a large quantity and variety of orchids.
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Cytology History

Hooke: Pioneering Cytology Studies Introduction Cytology is one of the areas of biology that took the longest to develop. This happened because the cells are not visible to the naked eye, so this science depended on the development of an instrument capable of enlarging and enabling the visualization of cells.
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Nutrient absorption by plants

Nutrient uptake by plants occurs through the roots. Introduction (macronutrients, micronutrients, and soil) Like us, plants need nutrients. These can be classified as macronutrients (required more) and micronutrients (required less). Macronutrients include hydrogen, carbon and oxygen, which plants obtain through the photosynthetic process.
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Plasma membrane

Plasma Membrane Surrounding Organelles What it is and functions Simply put, we can define the plasma membrane as a cell envelope. This envelope will be responsible for the shape of the cell and the substances entering and leaving it. Composition and other characteristics Its chemical composition is lipoprotein (fat + protein), but it is not homogeneous.
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Leukocytes

Lymphocyte: type of spherical-core leukocyte What are leukocytes - definition Leukocytes, also known as white blood cells, are cells present in the blood and produced in bone marrow and lymphatic tissue. They are called white blood cells because, unlike red blood cells (red blood cells), they have no pigments.
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Osmosis in the plant cell

Plant Cell Osmosis: vital to the plant's existence. Introduction All cells are lined with a membrane. A feature of this membrane that confers the ability to keep the cell alive is selectivity. The cell membrane, including plant cells, is semipermeable. It is crossed by water molecules.
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Cytochemistry

Cytochemistry: study of the chemical composition of cells What it is - Definition Cytochemistry is a branch of Cell Biology (Cytology) that focuses on the study of the chemical composition of cells and their molecular biological processes. It uses chemical and chemophysical analyzes that enable its observation. Cytochemistry is considered a link between biochemistry and morphology.
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Depression

Depression: A Disease That Can Have Multiple Causes Introduction - What It Is It is known that depression is a disease that is characterized by mood swings and loss of pleasure in previously enjoyable activities. Knowing depression: main features Unlike the state of sadness (common to all at certain times in life), depression is a problem of neurological origin that presents, besides deep sadness, a number of other symptoms.
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Pteridophytes

Fern: Most Common Example of Pteridophytes What They Are Pteridophytes are vascular plants that have no seeds. Main features - Chorus composed by root, stem and leaves; - They are tracheophytes, that is, they have a conduction system that transports the sap from the roots to the leaves. In these ducts are also transported food to the rest of the body; - Have leaves divided into leaflets; - New leaves appear rolled up; - Most species have sexual reproduction, but some can reproduce asexually through budding.
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Diabetes

Insulin Injection What is Diabetes is a disease of metabolism, ie it arises from a failure of our body. Insulin production deficiency In this disease, the pancreas, the organ responsible for the production of insulin (a hormone that allows glucose to enter cells), has insufficient or no production of this hormone.
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Cell Types

Prokaryote (Bacteria) and Eukaryotic (Plant) Cells Introduction The cells of living things can be prokaryotes or eukaryotes. What differentiates one type from another is the complexity of cell structure and functioning. Each living being is composed of one or more cells of only one type, that is, or the living being is prokaryote or eukaryote.
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Protozoan Diseases

Trypanosoma cruzi: Chagas' disease-causing protozoa Introduction Many protozoans that settle in the human body can cause disease. These protozoans can penetrate the human body in a variety of ways, such as body cuts, insect bites, contaminated food, etc.
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